New in the store today.

Soulcraftcandy greetings cards ©JonTremlett2013

Hot off the press, some of the new greetings card designs are now available in the Soulcraftcandy Store along with accompanying larger prints of the three images and an old favourite. So, if you’ve ever had a problem finding an appropriate card for that biking friend or relative and always come up short, then here could be a solution for you.

 

The three card designs in this first foray are from the Cafe Racer series of biro drawings completed last year and among my favourites. They have been digitally printed on heavy card stock with a matt finish to lend them some quality. They are A6 in size which works pretty well and helps me to offer them at a competitive price for a pack of three. Go take a look even if you’re not in the market, I’d welcome any feedback you’ve got.

 

The images on the cards are also offered as larger A3 and A2 fine art prints for those who feel like owning or giving something a bit more unique, and these are limited edition this time around, with a run of 250 prints in each size for each image. As I may have mentioned before these are Giclée prints of archival quality, fade resistant and on heavy stock acid free cotton paper.

 

That’s it for today, though I’ll leave you with a glimpse of something I’ve been fiddling with whilst I’ve been thinking about what I could put on a t-shirt. It’s just a sketch, but it could lead somewhere.

Soulcraftcandy sketch by Jon Tremlett

 

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Buy amazing motorcycle art here.

Todays big announcement is that the Soulcraftcandy on line art store is now open for business. As mentioned previously, following some very positive feedback and more than a healthy dose of encouragement, I have taken the leap to open an online micro-enterprise to enable fans of my work to purchase high quality prints of some of the drawings. You can jump straight to the site from here, or follow the link at the bottom of the ‘Shop’ page.

 

The decision to start small is a very deliberate one, which I hope will mean that it remains unique, interesting and manageable. As nice as it might sound to take the world of motorcycle art by storm and turn it upside down, this is not the purpose of the exercise at this point in time.

 

The intention is to offer small collections of prints that will change each quarter. So this initial set of five images, shown above, will be replaced by another set after three months and so on. If by chance certain pictures prove very popular then they may very well have a slightly longer run, or reappear in subsequent sets. My hope is that this will keep things fresh and interesting, and encourage viewers to return regularly to see what’s on offer. Ultimately it would be great to be able to offer a compendium of the sets in book form, but that remains a long term goal for now. As a matter of course all changes and updates will be signaled through the blog unless I’m gripped by a sudden urge to spring a complete surprise, which might be fun to do every now and then.

 

The choice of printing technology was discussed in the last post and so all of the prints available will be Giclée prints. Two sizes will be available for each image, A3 and A2 primarily, though some of the images will be in custom sizes and priced accordingly. As I mentioned before these prints are made on archival quality acid free cotton rag paper at 310 gsm weight.

 

One detail which caused much pause for thought was whether to offer limited edition numbered prints or something else. The latter approach won the day once I’d worked out how to instill a bit of extra value in each print beyond a hand written number in the corner. Consequently each print will be signed, dated and a small unique thumbnail doodle added at the same time. Essentially this will mean that each print will be unlike any other, no two being the same. My hope is that this will also help in the rotation of images as the need to wait for a certain order number to be satisfied will be removed. There will be a time for limited editions in the future, I’m sure of that but for now, this approach will hopefully keep things interesting.

 

Again, you can reach the store from this link, and thank you for taking the time to have a look.

 

Setting up shop, episode 2.

King of corners sample print.

You will have read in my last post that things have started to come together for the opening of the small internet shop for Soulcraftcandy where you will be able to purchase high quality prints of some of the drawings. I thought it might be interesting to write a little bit about the journey to this point so far.

So how are things going? Well, not too bad actually. Whoever you seek advice from in these matters, like in most cases in life really, you will receive plenty of information. All advice is good, you just have to work out which bits are most relevant to your course of action and use most of it to guide your decisions rather than slavishly following one point of view or another. Such was the case with the choice for which on-line retail supplier to go with. As it turned out, once this decision had been made, loads of other stuff seemed to fall into place as adhering to a given format or template made decision making much, much easier. There were some things though that remained outside of this comfortably convenient arrangement.

I know from many years selling design ideas to clients that although a concept may be brilliant, how others perceive it can be heavily effected by how you present the idea. In a sense the beauty of the presentation must be as wonderful as the idea contained within it, in order for it to gain maximum impact. Thus I knew that the quality of any prints I would be offering would have to be very high. I’d heard about giclee printing before, in fact I bought a print by another artist last year, it’s an impressive process. the challenge was to find a giclee printer in London who would take on my work. With a bit of research I’ve found one, and I think our relationship will be a good one. I chose him for all the usual good reasons but what really swung it for me was how I felt when entering his studio for the first time, it was immaculate. No offcuts or waste anywhere and spotless equipment. If ever there was a place which strongly adhered to the adage of “ a place for everything, and everything in its place”, this was it. The part of me that likes a tidy workshop and a box of clean, well kept tools was very happy. I ordered some sample prints from him and they are lovely.

The one at the top of this post is enlarged to A2 size from the original A3 format. I wanted to see what would happen to the line work and the drawing as a whole at an increased scale. I’m more than pleased with the result and this size will be offered in the store alongside the original A3 size for all prints. It’s almost as if I drew it originally at this size and after a bit of fiddling with saturation levels and such like, the image prints beautifully. Biro ink is not unusual in that the black is actually made up of lots of other pigments. As a result, when you digitise an image it often has a hue about it which can be perhaps blue or purple in nature. This can be difficult to control if you’re printing straight off, so a bit of careful adjustment is always required to get balance right.

King of corners sample print at A3

This print at the bottom is the A3 size. I clipped a business card to the board to give some idea of relative scales. And please excuse any discolouring in the photos. Even on a bright sunny day the camera seems to make up its own mind about light levels. You can though see the door of my shed, a small but meaningful space often used for moments of creative alchemy.